.All Trips / Central Canada / North America / Saskatchewan

Crescent Park, Moose Jaw

00 Crescent Park, Moose Jaw

I enjoy green public spaces and was glad to find the small prairie city of Moose Jaw had set aside a nice space for walking, playing and relaxing.  The grounds of Crescent Park are nicely maintained, as you can see in these photos.  Lots of birds were chirping in the trees and ducks enjoyed the parks waters.
Crescent Park was designed in 1911 and is just a block from the city’s main street.  It covers over 28 acres. The park is centered on Spring Creek.  A series of paths follow the banks of the creek and are part of the community’s trail system (Rotary Trails of Moose Jaw).

Crescent Park, Moose Jaw

Crescent Park, Moose Jaw


Scattered around the park are various monuments and flower gardens – even a time …

Read More

Tagged , , , ,
.All Trips / Central Canada / Manitoba

“Pic of the Week”, April 17, 2020: The Big Five, Manitoba Legislative Building

00 Nellie McClung

Situated on the west grounds of the Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg is an artwork depicting a meeting of women, known as the “Famous Five”.  They are gathered around a table signing a petition.

Best known of the five is Nellie McClung, a Manitoban who for years worked to bring about peaceful social change, and succeeded.  In January 1916 she helped Manitoba women become the first in Canada to win the right to vote.  She also helped influence the 1929 decision wherein Canadian women were recognized as “persons” under The British North America Act.  The signing of a petition for this legislation is the scene portrayed in this monument. 

While she was born in Ontario, Nellie moved to Manitoba in 1880 and …

Read More

Tagged , , ,
.All Trips / Alberta / Central Canada / North America

Exploring Midland Provincial Park

05 Midland Provincial Park (41)

Midland Provincial Park is located in Alberta’s Badlands and was established in 1979 to help conserve some of Alberta’s coal mining history.  The park was once the site of the Midland Coal Mine and the land was donated to the province after the mine closed.  The park is home to one of my favorite museums, the Royal Tyrrell, and adjoins the Red Deer River. 

Today’s post focuses on exploring the Midland Coal Interpretive Trail located roughly midway between the city of Drumheller and the Royal Tyrrell Museum.  This trail has a series of educational interpretive signs providing information about coal-mining in the area and to help you understand the artifacts on the grounds, A former mining office survives.

Coal Mining office, Midland Provincial Par

Coal Mining office, Midland Provincial Par

A rich …

Read More

Tagged , , , , , , ,
.All Trips / Alberta / Car Culture / Central Canada / North America

Great Cars along the Highway: 1958 Buick Special, Calgary

00 1958 Buick Special

A marquee car for Buick was its Special, considered an entry-level vehicle. This lovely 1958 model is the last year the Special was made. In the 1959 model year, the LeSabre was to replace the Special.

The chrome work on many cars from the 1950s is lovely, and this one certainly is not an exception.  Note the gas cap in the middle of the rear bumper.  The engine is a 364 cubic inch nailhead V8.  It has an automatic transmission. 

1958 Buick Special. Note the steel antennae by the wheels

1958 Buick Special. Note the steel antennae by the wheels

I was wondering what the function of these steel antennae behind the rear wheel was, and have to conclude that they were there to help with parallel parking.  If you hear metal scraping the curb, you’re too close.  A single antennae is also …

Read More

Tagged , , , ,

“Pic of the Week”, February 14, 2020: St Mary’s Parish, Banff

P1000327

A special place to visit when you’re exploring Banff is this pretty mountain church.

Catholic missionaries have had a presence in the Canadian Rockies for almost 200 years, including during the founding of the Banff townsite in the late 19th century.  A log cabin church was built in Banff in 1888 and it was consecrated as  ‘Our Lady of the Assumption’, but known by the locals as St Mary’s.

The church you see today was built in 1951 by Fr. Robert McGuinness, and it replaced the original building.  Fr McGuinness had attended seminary in Europe and loved the stone churches he saw there, inspiring him to build something of this type in his beloved town, Banff.   Fr. McGuinness had been a structural …

Read More

Karl on | Comments Off on “Pic of the Week”, February 14, 2020: St Mary’s Parish, Banff
.All Trips / Alberta / Car Culture / Central Canada / North America

Great Cars along the Highway: 1948 Ford Tudor Super Deluxe Sedan

00 1948 Ford Tudor Super Deluxe

This beautiful 1948 Ford was part of a car show in Calgary.  It’s powered by a 403 cu inch V8.  I remember as a boy, one of our family friends had a car of about this vintage and design, and I loved going for a ride in it. Couldn’t see much from the back seat as a kid, but it was still a fun ride.

(Click on thumbnails to enlarge, right arrow to advance slideshow)

Tagged , , ,

“Pic of the Week”, January 17, 2020: Moose Jaw’s, “Mac the Moose”

05 Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan (10)

Situated just off the TransCanada Highway, besides the city’s Visitor Information Center, is a massive statue of a moose know as Mac.   Mac the Moose was built in 1984, stands 32 feet (9.8 m) tall, and for a long time was the largest moose on Earth.   Mac has become somewhat of a roadside landmark for those who enjoy visiting such sites (I admit to this guilty travel pleasure). 

Moose Jaw is very proud of Mac.  Then, horrors of horrors, a larger moose was constructed in Stor-Elvdal, Norway.  That moose — known as Storelgen —  was completed in 2015 and is a polished stainless steel structure that is 30 centimeters (about a foot) taller than Mac.

The good news is that Moose …

Read More

Karl on | Comments Off on “Pic of the Week”, January 17, 2020: Moose Jaw’s, “Mac the Moose”

“Pic of the Week”, January 3, 2020: The Bounty of Canada’s Great Plains

00 Prairie crops, Manitoba (16)

The great Canadian prairies (and their American counterparts) grow a lot of food.  More food than can be consumed in either country and which is then transported to destinations all around our hungry world.  The Canadian prairies extend from Alberta in the west, to Saskatchewan, to Manitoba in the east.

While driving across the prairies to visit my father in Winnipeg this past year, I made a point of randomly turning up a country road or two, driving a few miles to see what was there.  

One turn lead to field of corn.  Corn is not that common a crop on the prairies and this likely would end up as feed corn for livestock (less likely for consumption in nearby Winnipeg …

Read More

Karl on | Comments Off on “Pic of the Week”, January 3, 2020: The Bounty of Canada’s Great Plains