.All Trips / Central Canada / Manitoba

“Pic of the Week”, April 17, 2020: The Big Five, Manitoba Legislative Building

00 Nellie McClung

Situated on the west grounds of the Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg is an artwork depicting a meeting of women, known as the “Famous Five”.  They are gathered around a table signing a petition.

Best known of the five is Nellie McClung, a Manitoban who for years worked to bring about peaceful social change, and succeeded.  In January 1916 she helped Manitoba women become the first in Canada to win the right to vote.  She also helped influence the 1929 decision wherein Canadian women were recognized as “persons” under The British North America Act.  The signing of a petition for this legislation is the scene portrayed in this monument. 

While she was born in Ontario, Nellie moved to Manitoba in 1880 and …

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“Pic of the Week”, January 3, 2020: The Bounty of Canada’s Great Plains

00 Prairie crops, Manitoba (16)

The great Canadian prairies (and their American counterparts) grow a lot of food.  More food than can be consumed in either country and which is then transported to destinations all around our hungry world.  The Canadian prairies extend from Alberta in the west, to Saskatchewan, to Manitoba in the east.

While driving across the prairies to visit my father in Winnipeg this past year, I made a point of randomly turning up a country road or two, driving a few miles to see what was there.  

One turn lead to field of corn.  Corn is not that common a crop on the prairies and this likely would end up as feed corn for livestock (less likely for consumption in nearby Winnipeg …

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“Pic of the Week”, November 22, 2019: Street Art sampler, Winnipeg

04 Trip to Winnipeg 08-2018 (80)

A few of the murals I saw while driving around Winnipeg this past summer.  Over the years the number and quality of these has shown an appreciated increase throughout the city. 

(Click on thumbnails to enlarge, right arrow to advance)

 

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“Pic of the Week”, September 27, 2019: Grand Staircase, Manitoba Legislative Building

00 Bison stairs

One of my favorite places to visit in Manitoba is the main entrance to it’s Legislative Building — home of the province’s governing body.  Within the entrance is a magnificent staircase framed by two bison — know affectionately by me as the Bison Stairs (but to most others as the Grand Staircase).  The bison is the symbol of the province of Manitoba.

The staircase is composed of Carrara marble and has three flights each with 13 steps.   The bison flanking the lower stairs are solid bronze and were cast in New York, each weighing 2 1/2 tons.  Apparently to install the bison without damaging the marble floors, the main entrance was flooded and left to freeze.  The bison were slide in on …

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“Pic of the Week”, May 17, 2019: Enjoying the last Remnant of Winter

P1110368

These photos were taken almost a year ago, after  an unusually long and cold winter, with snow lasting well into May, 2018. 

I visit my elderly father, who lives in Winnipeg, as often as possible.  He is no longer able to drive but he still likes to go on road-trips.  Just a little over 2 months ago we headed north of Winnipeg to the beach community of Victoria Beach, situated on the shore of massive Lake Winnipeg, where we’d had a cabin in the 1980s and 1990s.  My dad and I both have many special memories of this community during those years.

A focal point of the community is its pier, built and maintained by the Government of Canada as a place …

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“Pic of the Week”, April 5, 2019: Union Point Church, Manitoba.

03 Trip to Morris (11)

Sometimes it’s good to stop at places you’ve driven by hundreds of times and actually explore them.  Such was the case with my visit to the Union Point Church south of St. Agathe in southern Manitoba.

The church is situated between the north and south-bound lanes of highway 75, the road that connects Winnipeg to southern Manitoba and North Dakota.  It’s a fairly important road, so thousands of people drive by the church every day but I suspect hardly anyone ever stops for a visit.

Union Point church was originally built in 1887, destroyed by fire in 1939, and rebuilt in 1940. There’s a small cemetery beside the church with tombstones dating to the late 19th century.  There was once also a …

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“Pic of the Week”, August 24, 2018: A Disappearing Prairie Icon

elevator 1

Grain elevators, prairie sentinels, prairie cathedrals — all synonyms for the large structures that have dotted the Canadian prairies for more than a century.  I recall when traveling across the plains as a boy, you could spot these wooden towers at great distances — often 20 or more miles away — providing welcome relief to the otherwise flat landscape.  Each elevator was a storage facility that marked the location of a prairie town; the larger and more plentiful elevators were in a given location, the larger and more prosperous the town.

The business of the prairies is agriculture and mechanisms needed to be developed to get the bountiful grain crops to world markets.  After some experimentation with bagging the grain, it …

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.All Trips / Central Canada / Manitoba / North America

Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site, Manitoba

02 b-Lower Fort Garry

I’ve visited many interesting and historic places in my life, and hope to see many more.  Lower Fort Garry was the very first of these and, in a way, may have stimulated my desire to see and visit unusual destinations.  As a boy we traveled here by school bus for field trips, learning of the fort’s history and seeing actors in period costumes telling us about the lives they lead in the 19th century.  It was a hard life — much work, long bitterly cold winters, warm to hot summers filled with millions of mosquitoes.  Not at all pleasant.

Lower Fort Garry was built as a Hudson’s Bay Company post in what was then Rupert’s Land (now is Manitoba).  Fort Garry …

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