.All Trips / Eastern Canada / Food / North America / Nova Scotia

Halifax’s Seaport Farmers’ Market

00 Halifax Farmers Market and Food Tour (4)

Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market is the oldest continuously operating farmer’s market in North America, originating a year after Halifax was founded, in 1750.  For over 250 years the market has sold meat and produce delivered from Acadian farms in the Annapolis Valley and elsewhere in Nova Scotia.

The Market has operated in several locations across the city since its inception, including within the Keith’s Brewery Building.  In 2010 The Market moved into a converted warehouse along the Halifax Seaport and today hosts over 250 vendors! 

Halifax Seaport Farmers' Market

Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market

We spent more than a day exploring the waterfront area and made several stops at this market.  Our visit to Halifax was during the early fall so the produce available reflected the season — apples, peaches, plums …

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“Pic of the Week”, November 16, 2018: Halifax’s Old Town Clock

Citadel, Halifax (12)

The Halifax Town Clock (aka ‘Old Town Clock’, or ‘Citadel Clock Tower’) is situated just beneath the old Citadel on a hill overlooking the city and its harbor.   It has kept time for over 200 years and is considered one of the city’s iconic buildings.

The clock was a gift from Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Queen Victoria’s father). Prince Edward was the Commander-in-Chief of British Forces in North America and was stationed in Halifax for about a year, ending August 1800.  Upon leaving, the prince (who was obsessed with punctuality and found Halifax residents lacking in this regard) decided to give the city this timepiece.

The Clock was designed by Prince Edward’s engineer in 1801 and was crafted by the …

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.All Trips / Eastern Canada / North America / Nova Scotia

Halifax’s Legislative Home — Province House

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During my travels I often find myself visiting sites of government.  Not sure why this is so because, as a rule, most governments really annoy me.  Perhaps it’s because the buildings in which they’re housed are often grand and opulent and their landscaping beautiful, covering many acres of prime real estate. 

So a visit to Province House in Halifax was a pleasant change from the norm.  When we first spotted the building during our exploratory walk through the city, I thought it must be of some significance because it was old and looked important, but it is not at all large, occupying only a small city block.  Perhaps, I thought, it was a courthouse or library?  Turned out this was Province …

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.All Trips / Eastern Canada / Nova Scotia

A Visit to the Citadel, Halifax

00 Citadel, Halifax (9)

Halifax’s roots lie in its proximity to the sea, and its large natural harbor.  When the town was founded in 1749, among the first buildings constructed was a guardhouse atop what would become known as Citadel Hill.  The Citadel, because of its hilltop location, offered a strategic defensive position.  As the harborside town grew and changed, so did the fort which overlooked and protected it. 

The Citadel was completed in 1856, the fourth and last in a series of forts built at this site.  Its official name is Fort George (after King George II).  It has a distinctive star shape, strategic for allowing optimum defense of the structure.  Fortunately these defenses were never put to the test as the city was …

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.All Trips / Eastern Canada / North America / Nova Scotia

Lunenberg, Nova Scotia: A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Lunenberg, NS (9)

While I am not a fan of the provincial capitol of Halifax, I really enjoyed the rural landscapes of Nova Scotia, especially the many colorful and picturesque fishing villages along the coast.  The most interesting coastal community we visited was Lunenberg, situated about 90 km from Halifax.  It has rows of tidy well-kept homes, nice churches and shops, and a lovely waterfront.  Canadians best know Lunenberg as the birthplace of the Bluenose, a racing ship which graces the Canadian dime.

Lunenburg’s history has long been entertwined with the sea.   The first mention of an European settlement around here was in the early 1600s, which was a simple Acadian village.  The British saw the value of the …

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.All Trips / Eastern Canada / Ontario

Rambling around Thunder Bay’s Waterfront

00 Thunder Bay (51)

Situated on the northwestern shore of the world’s largest lake, Lake Superior, the small city of Thunder Bay is home to one of my favorite people (my baby brother).   I enjoy visiting the city, especially during its summers which are warm and pleasant.  

One of the nicest places to explore on foot is the waterfront along the northern section of town.  Much of the southern shore of Thunder Bay is devoted to transporting the bounty of the prairies to foreign markets.  There are many massive grain elevators alongside which ships pull up and fill their bins with wheat and other grains from the vast stores within the elevators.

The area around the Prince Arthur’s Landing has undergone a dramatic revitalization …

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“Pic of the Week”, December 29, 2017: Terry Fox Monument, Ontario

04 Thunder Bay (7)

The Terry Fox monument is located on the outskirts of Thunder Bay, just off the TransCanada Highway.  The monument honors a popular Canadian hero.  Terry had a leg amputated as a young man because of bone cancer.  Thinking he was cured, Terry began a “Marathon of Hope” raising cancer awareness and funds for the Canadian Cancer Society.  Every day Terry ran, in his hobbling manner on (by today’s standards) a primitive prosthesis, the full distance of a marathon with his goal being to run the breadth of Canada.  When he was nearly half finished, Terry became ill and had to abandon his quest.  Thinking at first it might just be a cold, Fox and the nation were heartbroken to discover …

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.All Trips / Eastern Canada / North America / Ontario

Ouimet Canyon, Ontario

07 03 Ouimet Canyon (36)

Situated about an hour outside the city of Thunder Bay on the Lake Superior’s north shore is a natural wonder you’d never suspect was there if you didn’t know about it.  This is where you’ll find Ouimet Canyon, one of Ontario’s many Provincial Park.   

You’ll need to do a short 1 km hike to get to the canyon from the parking lot.  The trail is partially smooth dirt, partially a boardwalk and overall is accessible to all.  It’s important to stay on the trails because the canyon is hidden by dense forest and you wouldn’t want to accidently step into the gorge.  The walk is easy and lovely and takes you to two viewing platforms from which you get panoramic …

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