“Pic of the Week”, September 15, 2017: Merrion Square, Dublin

Oscar 3

Merrion Square is a beautiful garden square in south central Dublin.  It was laid out after 1762 and was largely completed by the 19th century. It’s a wonderful place to visit when in Dublin, for a casual stroll or picnic or to relax in a bench and do some people-watching.

People like to linger here, but the most popular resident of the park is a colorful statue of Oscar Wilde.  Commissioned by the Guinness Ireland Group, it was sculpted by Danny Osborne and was unveiled about 20 years ago.

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854 – 1900) was an Irish writer and poet who resided across the street from the park.  Today he is best remembered for his novel The Picture of

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“Pic of the Week”: August 18, 2017. Temple Bar District, Dublin

01 Temple Bar intro

Ireland is well known for its music, food, Guinness, whiskey, and friendly engaging people, all of which (and more) can be found and enjoyed in Temple Bar District.

Temple Bar is an area on the south bank of the River Liffey in central Dublin. Unlike the areas surrounding it, Temple Bar has preserved its medieval street pattern, with many narrow cobbled streets.  Many of the pubs in the area are hundreds of years old.

Temple Bar is promoted as Dublin’s cultural quarter, being the location of many Irish cultural institutions, including the Irish Photography Centre, the Ark Children’s Cultural Centre, the Irish Film Institute, the Temple Bar Music Centre, the Gaiety School of Acting, as well as the Irish Stock Exchange …

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.All Trips / Europe / Ireland

St Stephen’s Green, Dublin

09 Dublin, St. Stephen’s Green 10 -2013 (15d)

Some have described St. Stephen’s Green as the heart of Dublin.  I guess that’s true of most good city parks, and it’s certainly true of St. Stephen’s.

We stayed at a small hotel just a block from St. Stephen’s when we visited Dublin and walked through the park several times a day as we went to and from our varying destinations in the city.  It was fall, cool but not cold (although crisp at night), and the leaves were starting to change color and fall to the ground.  As with everything else in Ireland, it was a lush green place.

The park goes back to the 17th century, but its current Victorian creation opened in 1880 for all people in Dublin.  Rectangular …

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Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin

Kilmainham

Kilmainham is one of the largest unoccupied prisons in Europe.  It’s situated in the west part of Dublin, not far from the famed Guinness Storehouse.  There’s a lot of Irish and English history here, including of Irish suppression and rebellion, so it makes for an interesting stop especially if you’re in the city for several days.

The jail opened in 1796 as the Dublin County Jail and as a debtor’s prison.  At that time it was considered a model prison, but by modern standards it was a stark and cold place to be confined.  It was often used by the British as a political prison, especially to incarcerate those who fought for Irish independence, including those of the firing …

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Europe / Ireland

National Museum of Ireland: Archaeology, Dublin

026 Dublin National Museum of Ireland Archaeology — The Tara Brooch, 8th century, Meath Co

Today we’ll pay a visit to the Museum of Ireland: Archaeology, situated on Kildare Street.  The Archaeology Museum is housed in an elegant dome-capped building designed by Thomas Newenham Deane and his son, Thomas Manly Deane, and was opened in 1890.  There are thousands of items on exhibit in the museum (from a collection of more than 2 million artifacts) outlining the unfolding history and treasures of Ireland, a country so very rich in history (less so in treasure).  Despite the extensive collection, the museum is well organized.  It’s easy to navigate and fun to explore.  You’ll need at least a half day for an introductory visit — much longer if you want to linger and thoroughly study the things you’ll …

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“Pic of the Week”, November 14, 2014. Door Knocker, National Museum of Archaeology, Dublin

003 Dublin National Museum of Ireland Archaeology — Door knocker

One of the greatest museums I’ve visited in recent years is Dublin’s National Museum: Archaeology.  What a fascinating collection of artifacts awaits your exploration and study beyond its doors.  As I found out while entering, the doors themselves are quite interesting.  My attention was drawn to this massive, beautifully crafted (if somewhat scary looking) door knocker.  You just don’t see craftsmanship like that anymore.

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.All Trips / Europe / Ireland

Guinness Storehouse, Dublin, Ireland

003 Guiness Storehouse Dublin

The Guinness Store attracts hundreds of tourists every day to what’s promoted as “Ireland’s #1 visitor attraction”.  Arthur Guinness began brewing stout at St James Gate Brewery in 1759.  Within a century this complex was the the largest brewery in the world, and it still brews 10 million pints a day (although today the Guinness brewery in Nigeria is larger than its Dublin counterpart, and the Coors Brewery in Golden, Colorado is now the largest single site brewery in the world).

The admission fee of about 15 Euros includes a self-guided tour of the old fermentation plant (everything is very well labeled and illustrated) and, when you’re done, a free pint of Guinness.  The old plant was refurbished in the late …

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Dublin, Ireland: Trinity College and its Book of Kells

060 Trinity College 2013 Library Book of Kells

Trinity College gives you a grand entrance to its inner courtyard.  Through a door within a massive larger door, you enter a square and see the college’s bell-tower (Campanile) set in its center, surrounded by an assortment of buildings.  The Campanile is one of the College’s — for that matter Dublin’s — iconic landmarks; built in 1853, it stands 30.5 m (100 ft) tall and is mostly constructed of granite.  You’ll not see students lingering under this tower because of a lasting superstition that if you’re beneath it when the bell tolls, you’ll fail your exams.  But enjoy it’s fine construction then look around a bit.

Beyond the bell-tower, there’s a lot to see at Trinity College.  Situated on the south bank of the River Liffey, …

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